Go Back   Yellowworld Forums > Interests > Archives > General > Arts & Entertainment

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-03-2005, 02:43 PM
robotic's Avatar
robotic robotic is offline
maple syrup fiesta
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Waterloo, Canada
Age: 24
Posts: 2,364
Rep Power: 322
robotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond repute
Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

http://www.jsalloum.org/planet3.wmv

A trailer-esque montage spectacle of Hollywood's relentless vilification and dehumanization of Arabs and Muslims.

Inspired by the book
"Reel Bad Arabs"
by Dr. Jack Shaheen

Out of 1000 films that have Arab & Muslim characters (from years 1896 to 2000)
12 were postive depictions, 52 were even handed and the rest of the 900 and so were negative.
__________________
you can't do anything about the length of your life,
but you can do something about its width and depth.
- evan esar
  #2  
Old 12-04-2005, 12:42 PM
Chad's Avatar
Chad Chad is offline
YW Mafia
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,097
Rep Power: 168
Chad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond reputeChad has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

Really disgusting. I would like to pretend that Hollywood doesn't reflect the views of Americans at large but I get a terrible feeling that it does.
  #3  
Old 12-04-2005, 01:40 PM
LaiSteve66's Avatar
LaiSteve66 LaiSteve66 is offline
Son of ARVN
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Age: 34
Posts: 2,438
Rep Power: 130
LaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

I'd like to know the 12 positive roles played by Arabs in Hollywood because I sure haven't seen one. Everytime I see an Arab in a movie, it's a terrorist and that video is revolting.
__________________
Don't blame me, I voted Libertarian.
  #4  
Old 12-04-2005, 03:03 PM
robotic's Avatar
robotic robotic is offline
maple syrup fiesta
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Waterloo, Canada
Age: 24
Posts: 2,364
Rep Power: 322
robotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by LaiSteve66
I'd like to know the 12 positive roles played by Arabs in Hollywood because I sure haven't seen one.
i wonder too ;_;

Negative Stereotyping Distorts Arabs' Image

By HOWARD ROSENBERG
Los Angeles Times, 30 July 2001

Caring Americans wring their hands over stereotypes in the U.S. that haunt blacks, Latinos, Asians, Italians, Native Americans, Catholics, Jews, gays and (you fill in the blank). Just as nasty, though, is the stigma that usually goes unmentioned.

An estimated 3.5 million Arab Americans live in the U.S. What would you say, about 3 million are terrorists? Well, half anyway.

Why wouldn't you think that?

Why wouldn't it be in the minds of knee-jerk TV newscasters who reported immediately after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that the FBI was seeking three males, two of them "Middle Eastern with dark hair and beards"?

Why wouldn't the security officers who ejected Abdullah Al-Arian from the White House annex think it too? Al-Arian is the Duke University student and congressional intern who was there for a meeting with Muslim leaders on President Bush's faith-based initiative last month when he was removed after a false tip that he was linked to terrorists.

You know, the shadowy guys we see again and again in movies and on TV. Because there are no other Arabs, right? Except, that is, for harem girls and bearded, limousined, oil-rich sheiks in dark glasses, wielding their billions like spiked clubs.

With violent conflict between Israelis and Palestinians again raging in the Middle East, their media images assume even greater weight and loom especially large. It's hard telling which side is winning the crucial public relations duel in the news, as bitter charges fly back and forth between these Jews and Arabs, each blaming the other for fomenting violence in the most recent intifada, estimated to have killed more than 600 in the last 10 months, mostly Palestinians.

As or PR points in opinion-shaping TV shows and feature films, though,

Arabs still are nearly shut out.

"There's an unending barrage of the same hate-filled images portraying Arabs as less than human," said scholar Jack G. Shaheen, whose excellent new book,

"Reel Bad Arabs," is a valuable, detailed, fast-reading compendium of
theatrical movies that follows his incisive earlier work, "The TV Arab."
"Not only are they bashed and vilified on a constant basis," Shaheen added from his home in South Carolina, "the religion [Islam] is thrown in too."

Shaheen mentions a minority of feature films he feels contain positive portraits of Arabs. And on TV? "Zilch, nunca, nada, zero," he said. "You never see Arab families. You never see people who look like and act and behave like other people."

One very, very rare exception is "The Kitchen," Andre Degas' aching small film about conflict between an assimilated young Egyptian American and his Old World-ish father who wants his musician son to one day take over his small grocery store in the Hell's Kitchen section of New York. The Independent Television Service production, which was shown on Father's Day on many PBS stations and Sunday on KCET, uses its Arab characters to explore
universal family themes.

More typical is the pilot for a new CBS fall series, "The Agency." It opens with a CIA agent giving a briefing on terrorists "sworn to wage holy war" against the U.S. and its friends. The rest of the story has the CIA scrambling to block a bombing planned by these foreign Arabs and learning that they control even a non-terrorist Arab diplomat posted in Washington.

Coming to CBS as well is "The President's Man: Ground Zero," with Chuck Norris reprising his role as a secret White House operative, this time aiming to stop "an Islamic terrorist," in the network's words, from taking out a major U.S. city with a nuclear device.

Why is "Islamic" relevant to his terrorism? Using it in this context ignores the enormous diversity of this religion, whose followers number more than 1 billion globally, the overwhelming bulk of whom are not fatalistic zealots or suicide bombers.

CBS agreed to drop "Holy War" from the original title, "The President's Man: Holy War," after a meeting with activists, said Salam Al-Marayati, executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles.

The network also promised to add an Arab American attorney general character to the movie and drop all references to religion but one reference to "Allah" (Arabic for God), Al-Marayati said.

A CBS spokeswoman confirmed the new title and the attorney general figure and said all "Allah" references were out.

She denied that the network had promised the activists anything specific, however, and added that script changes were underway even before the meeting with Al-Marayati and his group.

Latino drug lords are always an option as heavies.

With no more Soviets for U.S. heroes to fight on TV, thanks to the Cold War's ending, however, Arabs have become the clay pigeon of choice.

CBS is hardly the only TV culprit here. Almost from its inception, the
medium has been an equal-opportunity stereotyper, distorting or exaggerating the images of just about everything and everyone from gender types to ethnic and racial minorities. After all, it's much easier to reach for a cliché in a card file than dig for creativity.

The difference is that ugly smearing of other minorities is increasingly
balanced, at least somewhat, by positive portrayals, the result of intense
lobbying by advocacy groups. Not so Hollywood's evil Arabs.

"Whenever they can, they blow off Muslim concerns," said Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations.

"If they [portrayals] were neutral even 20% or 30% of the time, it might not be so upsetting.

But Muslims and Arabs seem to be the only people stereotyped 100% of the time. People point to the negative portrayals of Italians in 'The Sopranos' [HBO's series about Mafiosi in New Jersey], but there are 20,000 positive ones elsewhere."

It's time to note that the 1993 World Trade Center bombing was no dream and that Arab terrorists are no fantasy. History and news headlines tell us they are every bit as real and scary as Italian mobsters. The issue is balance.

Arabs are depicted as disgusting or they're invisible.

"I'm not saying an Arab should never be portrayed as a villain," Shaheen writes. "What I'm saying is that almost all Hollywood depictions of Arabs are bad ones. This is a grave injustice [because] repetitious and negative images of the reel Arab literally sustain adverse portraits across generations."

Many of the feature movies mentioned in "Reel Bad Arabs" get extended exposure, Shaheen notes, when "repeatedly broadcast on cable television and beamed directly into the home." And the proliferation of "billionaires, bombers and belly dancers" that he cited in earlier TV shows resurface evermore in syndicated reruns shoveled into that deepening infinity known as cable.

Still true is what Shaheen wrote in his earlier book: "The present Arab stereotype parallels the image of Jews in pre-Nazi Germany, where Jews were painted as dark, shifty-eyed, venal and threateningly different people."

Americans should wage against that. But not holy war.

arab-americans are a really versatile group, with familiar faces in the entertainment industry, governmental/political occupations, etc. having either paternal or maternal arab heirtage:

Paula Abdul -- Singer/dancer
Spencer Abraham -- U.S. Secretary of Energy
Elias Corey -- 1960 Nobel Prize Winner
Shannon Elizabeth -- Actress in "American Pie"
Doug Flutie -- 1984 Heisman Trophy Winner
Jeff George -- Football player
Dr. Michael De Bakey -- Pioneer heart surgeon
George Mitchell -- Former Senate Majority Leader
Danny & Marlo Thomas -- Actors
John Sununu -- Former White House Chief of Staff
Helen Thomas -- Former Dean of White House Press Corps
Bobby Rahal -- Indy 500 Race Car Champion
Current Congressmen -- Darrell Issa and Nick Rahall
Casey Kasem –- Radio personality
Lucie Salhany -- First woman to head a TV Network (FOX)
Jaime Farr -- Actor from M*A*S*H
Kathy Najimy -- Award winning actress
Ralph Nader -- Consumer advocate
Christa McAuliffe -- Teacher & space shuttle astronaut
Joseph Abboud -- Designer
F. Murray Abraham -- Oscar Winning Actor
Michael Nouri -- Actor in Flashdance
Tony Shalhoub -- Actor in T.V. series "Monk", among other films

but when prejudice against people of middle-eastern descent is the highest,

there's little to no advocation ._.
__________________
you can't do anything about the length of your life,
but you can do something about its width and depth.
- evan esar

Last edited by robotic; 12-04-2005 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  #5  
Old 12-04-2005, 03:54 PM
Paradox Paradox is offline
YW Mafia
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Age: 36
Posts: 1,211
Rep Power: 79
Paradox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond reputeParadox has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

The only ethnicity that has it far worse than anyone else right now are arab-americans. I have an indian friend that constantly gets mistaken as arab. He gets an enormous amount of stink eye and comments when he goes out. This is a highly successful person who makes 6 figures a year yet people will still go out of their way to make snide comments based on what they think he is. It's all very ugly and in more ways than one I think discrimination against muslims has become "acceptable" amongst some Americans.

We may get shitty depictions in the media but I really don't remember the last positive arab-american portrayal i've seen from hollywood.
  #6  
Old 12-04-2005, 04:38 PM
LaiSteve66's Avatar
LaiSteve66 LaiSteve66 is offline
Son of ARVN
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Age: 34
Posts: 2,438
Rep Power: 130
LaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond reputeLaiSteve66 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

I think Arabs have always had it bad. All the movies that I recognized in that video were made before 9/11.
__________________
Don't blame me, I voted Libertarian.
  #7  
Old 12-05-2005, 02:23 PM
robotic's Avatar
robotic robotic is offline
maple syrup fiesta
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Waterloo, Canada
Age: 24
Posts: 2,364
Rep Power: 322
robotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

i have a feeling that the relations of the u.s. with the arab world before the gulf war and the current war in iraq helped to aggravate the situation - the suez crisis in the 1950s in egypt, followed by the eisenhower doctrine and the lebanon invasion in 1958, the six-day war in 1967 between israel and the arab world over palestinian land, iranian revolutionaries in 1979 (although iranians aren't arab, i think its widely assumed that they are ^_^)

over the years, with arabs in america being an anonymous and invisible ethnic group, stereotypical views of arabs grew and grew.

i've realized that despite all the hate crime that grew after 9/11, no one wants to speak against the injustice, whether or not they are arab, arab-american or from the asian community at large. we're floating by, waiting for the next waqar hasan and balbir singh sodhi to happen.

maybe we are afraid, afraid that despite living in america for generations, you still can't be assigned to this elite label because of your religious or ethnic background. we choose to live in an invisible presence ._.

We live in a time when mass media has taken a major role in providing us with information about the world around us. We use that information in forming our opinions and evolving our emotions. We very often take that information for granted; we let ourselves use the same sources over and over again, without paying enough attention to the validity of the picture drawn by those sources, or the honesty of their motivations.

In a perfect world, the images provided in media would mimic reality, and present us with an accurate picture helping us formulate informed and fair opinions and judgments which ultimately drive our actions. Unfortunately, our world is far from perfect. As Arabs, we have suffered for long from the misconceptions and distorted picture that the current media has drawn of us for the consumption of the American public specifically, and the world generally.

It would not take you long to find a movie in which an Arab is shown as a terrorist trying to kidnap, kill or destroy someone or something. I challenge you to recall watching a movie in which Beirut was shown as the beautiful city that it is, instead of a war-struck city, in which the hero is escaping an Arab terrorist who is often depicted with an Egyptian accent. Nor would it be a simple task to find a movie showing an American family of Arab origin. Instead, you will almost always find the single Arab man, bearded and with the usual heavy accent and humorless demeanor. Unfortunately, there are all common themes in popular media, be it film, television series, or other forms.

The severity of our current reality is amplified by the lack of Arab talent. An Arab writer, using mere words, could describe how similar an Arab girl, boy, woman and man are to other Americans, yet how unique and beautiful their differences are. An Arab producer could bring to life a window onto a culture so rich, and communicate to the world the way the Arabs want to be seen. An Arab actor could redraw the human face of an Arab person, expressing the shared human joy, suffering and humor.

In his continuous desire to support the creation of the Arab talent, and in their stated goal of advancing the Arab interests in the US and abroad and empowering the Arab community, Tony Shalhoub and the Network of Arab American Professionals (NAAP) have collaborated to introduce the first Arab American Film Maker Award 2005.

- Annual Arab-American Film Maker Award (http://www.naaponline.org/filmmaker/index.asp)
__________________
you can't do anything about the length of your life,
but you can do something about its width and depth.
- evan esar

Last edited by robotic; 12-05-2005 at 04:05 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  #8  
Old 12-18-2005, 08:08 AM
robotic's Avatar
robotic robotic is offline
maple syrup fiesta
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Waterloo, Canada
Age: 24
Posts: 2,364
Rep Power: 322
robotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by Paradox
I have an indian friend that constantly gets mistaken as arab. He gets an enormous amount of stink eye and comments when he goes out. This is a highly successful person who makes 6 figures a year yet people will still go out of their way to make snide comments based on what they think he is. It's all very ugly and in more ways than one I think discrimination against muslims has become "acceptable" amongst some Americans.
one poster commenting on a syriana discussion said,

"Casting sees desis’ brown skin as closer to the popular conception of a terrorist than light-skinned Arabs

Following 9/11 majority of the people hassled on airports were South Asians. Well dressed and light skinned arabs pass for "white", so the "middle eastern looking" and "terrorist looking" falls squarely on the shoulders of South Asians."

both arabs and south asians are simulatenously fighting stereotypes: many people assume that we all must all look a certain way to be classified as terrorists. after 9/11, it was often sikh men who were targetted for the turbans they wore. 'brown-coloured' men with beards were shot for "looking" like terrorists.

;_;

why does the asian-american community not want to speak against south asian and arab discrimination?
__________________
you can't do anything about the length of your life,
but you can do something about its width and depth.
- evan esar

Last edited by robotic; 12-18-2005 at 12:45 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  #9  
Old 12-18-2005, 01:38 PM
Seamus's Avatar
Seamus Seamus is offline
Yellowworld Governor
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Land of Nod
Age: 36
Posts: 675
Rep Power: 99
Seamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by robotic
one poster commenting on a syriana discussion said,

"Casting sees desis’ brown skin as closer to the popular conception of a terrorist than light-skinned Arabs

why does the asian-american community not want to speak against south asian and arab discrimination?
For goodness sake, I don't think that's the case at all. I have heard numerous public comments from Asian American leaders against discrimination against South Asians and Middle Easterners. I, personally, get very irked whenever I see a stereotyped depiction of "brown" people in the media, even though I'm not brown. But my reaction is not because I'm a fellow Asian, but because I feel that it's wrong, period.

I'd like to get beyond labels. I don't think of myself as being Asian. I think of myself as being American (culturally) and Chinese (ancestrally). If another Asian group is discriminated against, I'll oppose it, but not because society labels us both as "Asians," but because we're both humans
  #10  
Old 12-18-2005, 03:15 PM
robotic's Avatar
robotic robotic is offline
maple syrup fiesta
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Waterloo, Canada
Age: 24
Posts: 2,364
Rep Power: 322
robotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond reputerobotic has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by Seamus
I'd like to get beyond labels. I think of myself as being American (culturally) and Chinese (ancestrally).
i guess labels can connotate good things,
and bad ._.

but is there an inherent downfall to "pan-asianism", except for exclusion?
__________________
you can't do anything about the length of your life,
but you can do something about its width and depth.
- evan esar

Last edited by robotic; 12-18-2005 at 03:21 PM.
  #11  
Old 12-18-2005, 03:41 PM
Seamus's Avatar
Seamus Seamus is offline
Yellowworld Governor
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Land of Nod
Age: 36
Posts: 675
Rep Power: 99
Seamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond reputeSeamus has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by robotic
i guess labels can connotate good things,
and bad ._.

but is there an inherent downfall to "pan-asianism", except for exclusion?
For all of the examples I can think of, labels for people only connote bad things. At best, labels are harmless; at worst, labels limit the range of who you're "allowed" to be. The pan-Asian label IS exclusionary. It's both inappropriately broad, as well as unnecessarily narrow. Apologies if I'm sounding vague.
  #12  
Old 12-19-2005, 10:31 PM
phobs phobs is offline
Yellowworld Fetus
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 12
Rep Power: 0
phobs is on a distinguished road.
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

that video is horrible. its sad the route hollywood takes towards entertainment
  #13  
Old 12-20-2005, 09:21 AM
Faithless's Avatar
Faithless Faithless is offline
How now dead Mao?
 
Joined: May 2003
Location: Aberration
Age: 50
Posts: 16,330
Rep Power: 579
Faithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond reputeFaithless has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

What's the equivalent of yellowface for these portrayals in Hollywood?

IMDB search of Arab characters

Some notable actors playing Arabs:

Lee J. Cobb
Antonio Fargas

Then there was Jerry Ito who played an Arab in " Umi no yarodomo" (1957).

__________________
Holy Orders

Last edited by Faithless; 12-20-2005 at 09:33 AM.
  #14  
Old 12-20-2005, 10:34 AM
Craig's Avatar
Craig Craig is offline
Yellow Peril
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Frisco
Age: 40
Posts: 3,810
Rep Power: 230
Craig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond reputeCraig has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Originally Posted by Chad
Really disgusting. I would like to pretend that Hollywood doesn't reflect the views of Americans at large but I get a terrible feeling that it does.
Perhaps it is more appropriate to think that Hollywood creates and influences the views of Americans at large (some locales more than others), instead of reflecting them.
  #15  
Old 12-20-2005, 07:27 PM
phobs phobs is offline
Yellowworld Fetus
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 12
Rep Power: 0
phobs is on a distinguished road.
Re: Portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood

QUOTE:
Perhaps it is more appropriate to think that Hollywood creates and influences the views of Americans at large (some locales more than others), instead of reflecting them.
This is definitely the case outside of cities. In my experience, when people rarely meet people of a certain race they draw their assumptions from what they see in the media.
 

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Movies and/or portrayals every Asian American should see kimpossible Arts & Entertainment 182 10-14-2012 09:20 AM
Muslims sue U.S. over border detentions robotic Current Events 0 04-20-2005 11:56 PM
Asian American portrayals in Asia Faithless Arts & Entertainment 18 11-01-2004 01:37 PM
Arabs need to try nonviolence Kuchana Rant Room Hall of Fame 93 04-18-2004 12:25 PM
Gibson's 'The Passion' a Hit Among Arabs Kuchana Arts & Entertainment 37 04-11-2004 02:49 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006 Yellowworld.org